Tagged: fitness

Serious Competition, Serious Fun: The Title Nine Olympics.

At Title Nine we believe that sports and fitness can be fun and transformational. It says so right on our walls. Our CFO leads Tabata classes in the company gym. Lunchtime yoga is taught by a customer service rep. The distribution center hosts parking lot boot camp classes, and our stores hold their meetings while hiking or navigatiWe believeng ropes courses.

We believe sweating together, laughing together, and encouraging each other makes us better coworkers, and in turn, a better company for all of our customers.

Cheering TeamWhich is why, once a year since 2002, we shut down headquarters, suspend shipping, send customer service phones to voice mail, and fly in all 23 store managers from across the country. We come together for a day of teamwork, athletics, and a lot of silliness at the Title Nine Olympics.

Serious Competition

The 2015 games were held at a cavernous local gym. We began our morning by dividing up into eight teams with names such as Dink & Sparkle, Bras n’ Bros, and Back in Black. Team captains were chosen, cheers composed, and hilarious dances choreographed. Team loyalty was strong, and the competition was serious (injuries included), but ultimately we knew we were all playing on one big team.

Morning games included Off the Wall Ball (a game made up by our founder, Missy), Office Chair Foosball, Human Hungry Hungry Hippo, and Cup Stacking. The games were a mix of physical exertion, mental strategy, and just plain ridiculousness – something for everyone.



Celebrate The Backside

The Backside

Do your thighs power you up long hills on your trail run? Do your hips keep you stable on your SUP? Can your butt get you through a century bike ride without complaint? It’s time to celebrate these often maligned body parts! How does your backside keep you moving?


Coaches of T9

The team at Title Nine has many players — and many coaches. Our own athletic and personal lives have been shaped and influenced by coaches we’ve had, making the decision to embark on the same path an important one. We look up to those who lead the way for us: it’s time for us to lead the way for the next generation.

Do YOU coach? Tell us why below.


Coaches of T9


Photo Gallery: What a Mother Runner Looks Like

If you saw our previous post on the What a Mother Runner Looks Like, you know that it’s some powerful, inspiring stuff. The photo submissions for the project were such a success that their release was split into two parts. We chose to share with you the second edition as the copy is beautifully written and says a lot about the project. You can also see photos from Part 1 here, and the rest of Part 2, here. And again, please feel free to participate in the project by sending us your photos! We will happily share and deliver photos to AMR on your behalf. 

What does a mother runner look like? Strong. And smiley.

Up today: round two of What Another Mother Runner Looks Like. 75 or so mother runners who come in a range of shapes and sizes, but personify what mother runners stand for: confidence, strength, ambition, inspiration, vibrancy.

I hope the combined 132 pictures drove home the point that there is no such thing as a stereotypical runner. Sure, there are wisps who whip across the line seemingly effortlessly—and there are a few of them in this collection (and yes, we love you and your little bods!)—but the majority of the pack are runners who might have bulky quads; who might have a little extra bulge on their midsection; who might be far from the “ideal” runner physique.

But here’s the thing about the majority of us: we’re dominating the race fields. Some days, we’re running long. Some days, we’re running fast. Some days, we’re just running. We’re setting PR’s and killing the hills. We’re surprised by how running has become ingrained in our DNA, the reward of dedication and consistency. We’re inspiring others to try it.

In short, we are redefining what a runner looks like.

I wanted to share a few thoughts from Rebecca, who describes herself as overweight/obese since puberty (“and three pregnancies haven’t helped,” she adds). When she submitted her picture, she wrote,

Rebecca went outside her comfort zone to participate. That’s some serious strength.

 “I like your idea for a photo essay: real women, with real bodies. It’s outside my comfort zone, but I’ve decided to include my photo because I think there are plenty of other women out there whose bodies look more like mine than any of the 14 shown so far. And I think it would mean a lot to those other women to see someone more like themselves. Women who equally value the another mother runner community that the two of you promote.”

Rebecca: we so appreciate you—and the rest of you—who have put yourself out there. There is a reason why this community is so valuable: it’s as strong and supportive as the collective legs we run on.

Again, I ask you to please share this gallery: Facebook it, tweet it, send it to your pals. Thank you, thank you. And here’s the link to Part I in case you missed it. (And full disclosure: I am not in this. I meant to be, but it’s 9:15 p.m. and I have to run at 5:20 a.m. and I have no interest into changing into a sports bra and spandex right now. Raincheck. Promise.)